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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

November Full Moon Voting

Everywhere you turn someone or some group is asking for your vote. After awhile, it becomes a blur. The last time we got involved in politics was in 1828 when we said that “Congress spoke to much and spent too much” and haven’t felt it necessary to do so since. But this year we are asking for you to vote or to weigh in on what we might call a Full Moons.

There are traditional names put forth by Native Americans hundreds of years ago. The names were based on observations for the month or the light of the moon allowed people to do certain things into the night. On November 2nd, we will have the Full Hunter’s Moon. Bright moon light allowed Americans to hunt late into the night. Today, hunting is not allowed after dark – no matter how bright it is. So during the first half of October we received almost 200 suggested moon names for the November Full Moon. We brought it down to 4 of the most popular and now is the time to vote.

Current Results:
42% – Full Thankful Moon
29% – Full Gathering Moon
17% – Full Turkey Moon
11% – Full Frosty Moon

Express your opinion by going to our home page or to http://www.farmersalmanac.com/name-that-moon .

0 comments

1 Kevin { 11.09.09 at 3:08 am }

I like Hunter Moon too.

2 brian { 10.28.09 at 8:23 am }

Leave it the hunter moon. Don’t mess with traditions please. Why is every thing got to be new and improved? Instead teach the tradition people need to know that we use to have to hunt or grow our food. Not run to the super market. Keep it the hunter moon.thanks

3 Sara Steinhear { 10.21.09 at 2:07 pm }

I like full tummy moon :)
but since I have to vote for one of these I say thankful! Let’s hear it for traditions

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