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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Six Fun Things to do in July

Six Fun Things to do in July

July is best for:

Swimming: Get to the pool — backyard, neighborhood, or community; head to a lake, or go to the ocean. Swimming is great exercise and a good way to cool down.

Eating Watermelon:
It’s good for you, it’s in-season, and it is kid-friendly. Check out our unusual recipes for watermelon.

Drinking Iced Tea and Lemonade:
Nothing’s better on a hot summer day than a cold glass of iced tea or lemonade. Make your own, or splurge with the store-bought mix.

Indulge with Ice Cream:
Soft-serve ice cream is a great way to end a hot summer day or break up a lazy summer afternoon. (Maybe even have an ice cream dinner party! No cooking and the kids will be amazed that you’re allowing them to eat it for dinner!)

Reading Books: Motivate the kids to read this summer by offering incentives (a penny a page). Get yourself a good book, and carve out some time to read.

Family or Me Time:
Even though the summer can be busy with work or activities, extracurricular activities are usually a little slower. Spend quality time with the kids — play a board game, take a hike, go fishing. If you don’t have kids, find the time to just sit and enjoy the weather, a good book, or even a favorite hobby.

What is your favorite way to spend July? Share your ideas below!

3 comments

1 Victoria { 08.05.10 at 2:06 am }

Oh yeah, and read Farmers’ Almanac!

2 Victoria { 08.05.10 at 2:04 am }

Enjoy every minute of summer. Start a family tradition of any kind. Soon fall will be here and the long hall back to summer will be among us.

3 June Bug { 07.21.10 at 10:02 am }

Attend the local ice cream social, the ice cream is home made, they offer seven different flavors, a country western band plays and it makes for a lovely evening. Cook peach jam, cook spiced tomato jam and enjoy watching my flowers bloom.

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