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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Reduce Your Waste for Earth Day

Reduce Your Waste for Earth Day

Earth Day is a great time to pause ad take stock of our habits. Is there more we can be doing to protect the Earth’s resources?

You probably already know that recycling, and buying recycled products, are an easy and effective way to reduce waste, but don’t forget about the other two steps in the popular “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” slogan.

Here are a few simple ways to reuse everyday household items that might otherwise end up in the trash:

- An empty mustard squeeze bottle is great for decorating cakes and cookies. Wash and deodorize it with baking soda before filling it with frosting.

- Used envelopes make great scrap paper. Carefully open up the envelopes and use the inside for notes, lists, etc.

- Used popsicle sticks are handy for windowsill or outdoor gardens. They can be used to mark seed varieties and planting dates planted, or as “stakes” to mark outdoor garden rows.

- Large tuna fish cans are the perfect size and shape for baking small pumpkin breads as gifts.

- Old, well-used oven mitts are great for washing and waxing your car.

- Don’t fret over a lost leather glove; turn the remaining one into a handy little carrier for light tools. Cut off the fingers at the mid length, make two slits in the back to run your belt through.

- Recycle old socks into cost-free doll clothes. Cut away the foot and stitch them into imaginative stretch outfits.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.