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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
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10 Fun Ways to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

10 Fun Ways to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

What are your plans this St. Patrick’s Day? If you’re still trying to decide, why not try some of these fun ideas? And remember, no matter what your heritage, on St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish!

  1. Wear green — Okay, this is the obvious one. But dressing for St. Patty’s can go beyond a green shirt. Try being green from head to toe — pants, shoes, hat, face paint, and even a green wig! Nobody said it was easy being green, but people will love you for it on March 17.
  2. Attend a parade — If your city holds a St. Patrick’s Day parade, go! And if not, why not plan a shamrock get-away to a town that does? Some of the cities with grand celebrations include New York, Montreal, Boston, Chicago, and Savannah, Georgia. If you’re really feeling the St. Patty’s spirit, you could take that trip to Ireland you’ve always dreamed of. If traveling isn’t in the budget, you’re sure to at least find a good parade on television.
  3. Throw a party — Invite your friends over for a St. Patrick’s Day party. Award a prize to the greenest dressed guest. Hide a pot of gold, and send guests on a treasure hunt.
  4. Eat green foods — This is the day to eat all your favorite green foods — salad, guacamole, green peas, zucchini, pesto, pistachios, lime sherbet, green frosted cupcakes, and the list goes on and on.
  5. Decorate — Green your home or office with strands of green lights, shamrocks, leprechauns, and streamers.
  6. Look for four leaf clovers — Pack a picnic and head to the park or just relax in the backyard while you look for one of those lucky four leaf clovers.
  7. Wear a “Kiss Me, I’m Irish” button — even if you’re not Irish.
  8. Take an Irish step-dancing class — Not only is it great exercise, it’s a ton of fun! If your feet aren’t fast enough, attend a show.
  9. Play Celtic music — Pull out those old favorites or pick up a couple of new CDs at the store.
  10. Send St. Patrick’s Day greeting cards — Sign your last name with an O’ in front of it!

6 comments

1 MoBarbq { 03.15.12 at 5:12 pm }

I used to live in Rolla, MO. They go all out on St. Pat’s Day! College town, green beer, paint the streets green near UM-R… I miss the culture connected to that, if nothing else!

2 Karoline { 03.14.12 at 4:22 pm }

You left out the largest parade in Wisconsin and the Nation’s 3rd Top Family Oriented celebrations which is New London, WI or as we call ourselves during this particular week, New Dublin, WI.

3 Kathleen { 03.14.12 at 11:35 am }

I was born on ‘Catholic Hill’, predominantly Irish in Seattle in the ’50′s. I remember seeing so many people outside, children playing, people sitting on the porch, talking to one another. You knew your neighbors blocks away.
Best way Americans can celebrate St. Patrick’s Day is to get hold of ‘The Confessions of St. Patrick’ and witness the writings of an old man whose spirit was as fresh as the air and wind coming in from the seas, and the purity of a child’s innocence still remaining in his soul.
It’s so contrary to him to use the day for intoxication and brawling.
I remember going back to my roots at ‘Kathleen’s of Dublin’ gift shop and a man opening the door of the shop…looked like a Scot…and exclaiming he was going out to get drunk!

4 Jan Newman { 03.16.11 at 5:11 pm }

I will make everything Irish

5 L.Macy { 03.16.11 at 9:06 am }

You left out my 3 Irish favorites:
1. Food (Irish oatmeal for breakfast, bangers & mash, Shepherd’s Pie, corned beef-cabbage-&potatoes, Irish stew, Irish cheeses, etc.)
2. Spirits (Guiness, Harp, Smithicks, Jameson’s or other Irish whiskey, Irish cream liqueur, etc.)
3. books (adult & childrens) of Irish stories, legends, provrbs, & sayings.
(PS: 3-leaf clovers, representing the trinity, are the Irish clover of choice.)

6 Willow { 03.16.11 at 6:28 am }

How fun! I love little celebrations! Great ideas too – just made my list for tomorrow’s St. Patrick’s Day dinner!

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