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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Presidential Trivia

It is great to live in a country where enormous power seamlessly shifts between parties in such a grand fashion. In the  the morning it is President Bush and a few hours later it is President Obama. The enormity of what transpires behind the scenes is what captures  our attention. Literally hundreds of “new hires” report to work. With all the challenges facing us, there is hope for the future. I think it is the potential that we all celebrate today.
 
My best wishes go to our 44th President and his team! We know that President Obama is the first African American president, but here is some presidential “first” trivia:
 
1. Who was the first president born outside the original 13 states?
 
2.. Who was the first president to appear on television?
 
3. Who was the first president born in a log cabin?
 
4. Who was the first president to live in the White House?
 
5. Who was the first president to make a radio address?
 
6. Who was the first president to wear a beard?
 
Bonus:  The Farmers’ Almanac was established in 1818. Who was the first president in office at the time of our first issue?
 
 
Enjoy today –  as with all other inauguration, this is history in the making.
 
 
 
 
(Answers: 1 Abraham Lincoln – in the backwoods of Kentucky, 2. Franklin Roosevelt – April 30th, 1939 at opening ceremonies of the World’s Fair in NYC., 3  Andrew Jackson, 4. John Adams moved in November 1, 1800. He lived there for 4 months, 5. Warren Harding (in June of 1922), 6. Abraham Lincoln. Bonus: James Monroe who served from 1817 – 1825.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.