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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Sometimes it’s what’s left behind . . .

click to enlarge

. . . that really counts.

Over the holidays my mom had Christmas Eve at her house. It was crazy – 9 kids ranging from 2 to 13, 10 adults, and lots of food. While good times were had and memories made, a few days later when she was sweeping up the “garbage” left behind, she looked down and found a pile of stuff that made her grateful.

No, she’s not a dumpster diver or a garbage freak, but it was within this pile of refuse — a broken balloon, pieces of ribbons, crumbs of candy canes…garbage, but to my mom this garbage had a special meaning.

It was proof that we had a good time, that kids and parents alike were able to get together to celebrate a special holiday and share in good times. It was in looking at this pile that she was reminded of how grateful she was for her life, family, and health.

Fast Forward to Today

Are Valentine’s wrappers left behind from yesterday’s activities?

Are your kids’ toys “decorating” the living room?

Is the snow outside pure and white?

Before you tackle any clean up or shoveling, take a few minutes to look at what has been left behind to see if there’s another message in this mess. Sure the wrappers should be in the garbage, but savor the fact Valentine’s Day is a special time to appreciate loved ones.

Toys everywhere may be annoying, but one day there won’t be any toys and instead they’ll be driving around in cars.

Yes, that snow needs to be shoveled, but is the sunshine making the snow look like there are diamonds shining on your lawn?

Sometimes it is what’s left behind that counts. This also goes for the environment. Sometimes what a package or garbage leaves behind is what really matters.

My thought for the weekend ahead. Oh and yes, my mom did sweep up her pile and put it in the trash, but not until she took a picture of it.

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garbage, thought that counts, mess, valentine’s , farmers almanac thoughts

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.