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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

The Snow “Dance”

Winter is definitely here and in many areas the snow is piling up. But in others, where snow is a good possibility in the winter, there hasn’t been as much as say the Farmers’ Almanac’s home state of Maine (man do they have snow!). So at our house, we’ve been doing the SNOW DANCE.

My eight-year-old daughter, has decided on a nightly ritual that’s supposed to help bring on a snow day. It’s not really a dance but it’s definitely a ritual. This is what she does: Wear pajamas backwards and inside out, place ice cubes in all toilets in your house, and sleep with spoons under your pillow. So far it’s worked in that we have a few inches on the ground, but alas not enough to call off school. She suggested that maybe we need to share this snow dance with more people, thus I’m sharing it with you …in case you want to try.

If you do have snow in your area, what are you doing to cope with all the extra clothes and boots you have to wear? In the 2006 Farmers’ Almanac, freelancer Jean Grigsby shared the following fun idea:

Make Layering Fun:
This winter make a contest out of dressing for the cold. Who is wearing the most colors? Who has on the most clothes? Who’s most covered up? Who is unrecognizable?

What to do:
If snowy conditions aren’t in your forecast and you still would like to enjoy winter fun, head to an ice skating rink! Lots of fun for the whole family. Or take a trip to a winter wonderland.

There’s something magical about snow, and yes even a snow day when it brings you back to a day of having nothing to do. Or better yet, pick a day and designate it a snow day — and do nothing but family fun things.

See when the next snow may be predicted in the Farmers’ Almanac here. Enjoy and let us know if the Snow Dance works for you!

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.