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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Don’t get the Wedding Woes

Don’t get the Wedding Woes

Accumulating debt can come in a number of ways, but couples can sometimes create their own problems by blowing their budget on a wedding. Couples often justify the extra debt as being part of the one day they will remember the rest of their lives. But there are ways to stay on budget and not skimp on your wedding day.

Here are a few tips:

- A rule of thumb is to spend two months’ salary on an engagement ring. But for most people, two or three weeks of salary will buy very nice jewelry. Or you may have a relative who has a nice piece of jewelry they don’t wear and may be willing to give it to you as a wedding gift.

- Wedding gowns can cost hundreds of dollars for a dress that will be worn once. Wedding gowns rentals begin at about $100. For a few dollars more you can rent a much nicer gown than you can buy.

- Photography can be expensive. If you don’t have a friend or relative who is a photographer, consider hiring a professional for only the formal shots and have friends take reception photos. Or have disposable cameras at each table and let your guests be the photographers.

- Schedule the reception during the day. People tend to eat and drink less during the day. And brunch food costs less than dinner.

- DJs cost less than live bands and can provide a wider range of music. DJs are also accustomed to working receptions and can serve as the Master of Ceremonies.

- Decide in advance what your wedding and reception budget will be and vary as little as possible from that number. Be wary of aggressive sales people who say it’s okay to splurge.

Consumer Credit Counseling Service is a non-profit agency that can help clients manage debt by setting a budget and payment plan. CCCS helps thousands of its clients decrease interest rates, stop late payment charges, stop over-the-limit fees, extend credit terms and stop creditors from calling their home.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.