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Farmers Almanac
The 2015 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

January’s Full Wolf Moon

Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the howling of wolves could be heard in the cold winter nights outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January’s full moon, the Full Wolf Moon.

Because wolves often hunt at night, their howling has become associated with nightfall and particularly, the moon. However the centuries-old notion of wolves howling at the full moon is known to be more folklore than fact.

Because January’s full moon was usually the first full moon after Christmas, some cultures referred to it as the Moon After Yule. Others have sometimes referred to January’s full moon as the Full Snow Moon, but most Native American tribes applied that name to the next full moon.

Get all 12 months of full moon names here »

16 comments

1 I live by the Alamanic { 01.19.15 at 10:42 am }

The Alam

2 Sarah Walker { 01.02.15 at 3:04 pm }

I have just become a member and the Emails I have gotten is so full of info. I love reading and learning about the things I knew nothing about so interesting and helpful .Thanks !

3 Teri Campisi { 12.31.14 at 11:01 pm }

I love the Farmer’s Almanac! Always have one in my home! Thank you for the information you give throughout the year! I especially like the info on the moon. Hope you all have a very Happy and prosperous New Year!

4 Guin Chapman { 12.31.14 at 7:46 pm }

I love the info. you provide about planting time, because the Bible says there is a time to plant and etc. I like the Info. about the moon in regard to the fishing, about names of the full moons, I love everything about it.

5 After brief rainy interruption, warm temperatures to return | Weather Matters { 12.31.14 at 2:30 pm }

[…] IN THE NEW YEAR: The first full moon of 2015 occurs Sunday at 11:54 p.m. The Farmer’s Almanac says this full moon was called the “Full Wolf Moon” among Native American tribes […]

6 January 2015 Spiritual and Magical Properties of Essential Oils, Fragrance Oils, and Herbs | Mama Bear Musings { 12.31.14 at 1:00 pm }
7 Patti Lawson { 12.31.14 at 11:45 am }

I love the information on the “moons.” I use the almanac to keep up on the weather as well. There’s something magical about this publication. I thank you for it.

8 Curtis Duncan { 12.31.14 at 11:42 am }

Thanks for the information..I use it on my morning drive programs on KLOE AM…and KKCI FM weekdays. Do you have some promo copies of the Almanac I could use on the air?
Happy New Year to the Almanac Staff,.

9 david dillow { 12.31.14 at 10:39 am }

Always enjoy the American folklore you provide! Since I’ve started planting in the moon instead of the ground like my grandfather tried to tell me, my garden yields have been much better. Follow your planting guide religiously. Happy new year.

10 Patches { 12.31.14 at 10:00 am }

I really enjoy reading information about moon phases. Happy New Year everyone.

11 bob { 12.31.14 at 9:20 am }

I have been following the Farmers Almanac for several years just to take note of the weather forecasts of the Almanac. I’m amazed at how spot on the Almanac has been over the years with their forecasting.

12 Jean Dulaney { 12.31.14 at 9:19 am }

Thanks, Susan Lockstedt, I never thought to explore Farmers Almanac regarding “weeding”… the curse of ‘home ownership’! HA

13 susan lockstedt { 12.30.14 at 10:27 am }

I refer to the almanac on a regular basic. Gardening, weather, the moon and even weeding my property. It has become a way of life.

14 DonnaDunham { 01.15.14 at 7:46 pm }

Love the full moon this one will also be the furthest from earth
Love info about the magical properties of the moon’s.

15 Margaret Gee { 01.14.14 at 7:07 pm }

love all the information

16 Lorrie Beck Mundell { 01.14.14 at 4:35 pm }

Love reading The Farmers Almanac..so interesting. I plant my garden with the moon phases..

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