Current Moon Phase

Waning Crescent
33% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

October’s Full Hunter’s Moon

Find out why October’s full moon was an important signal to Native Americans as they prepared for the upcoming long winter in this month’s installment of Full Moon Names.

6 comments

1 Phyllis { 10.20.13 at 10:12 pm }

Look forward to the education

2 james fischer { 10.17.13 at 9:47 am }

I would surely enjoy receiving your farmer’s almanac and more exciting news in this area.

3 jody stevens { 10.17.13 at 9:17 am }

May my family and I receive God’s Blessing in this Hunter’s Full Moon. Thank you for the information.

4 Michael Amato { 10.16.13 at 4:06 pm }

I believe during the full moon on October 18th, there will be a phenumbral eclipse. There will be a slight darkening on one edge of the full moon. Binoculars will help show were the slight darkening of the eclipse will be.

5 Michael Amato { 10.16.13 at 4:05 pm }

I believe during the full moon on October 18th, there will be a phenumbral eclipse. There will be a slight darkening on one edge of the full moon. Binoculars will help show were the slight darkening of the eclipse will be.

6 Theresa Connors Elliot { 10.16.13 at 8:48 am }

Thank you for the history of the October Full Hunter’s Moon. I look forward to receiving my Farmer’s Almanac e-mail each month with this interesting information. Keep up the great job!

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.