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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

November 13th: Total Eclipse of the Sun

November 13th: Total Eclipse of the Sun

The first and only total eclipse of the Sun of the year happens this week, but unless you plan to charter a ship to the middle of the Pacific Ocean, you won’t get a chance to see it.

The eclipse takes place on Tuesday, November 13, but virtually the entire path of totality falls over water. At the very beginning, the track cuts through Australia’s Northern Territory just to the east of Darwin, then across the Gulf of Carpentaria, then through northern Queensland, before heading out to sea. The rest of the eclipse path is, unfortunately, pretty much wasted by falling over the open waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Partial Eclipse Begins: 2:38 p.m. – Total Eclipse Begins: 3:35 p.m. – Greatest Eclipse: 5:12 p.m. – Total Eclipse Ends: 6:48 p.m. – Partial Eclipse Ends: 7:45 p.m. – Maximum Duration of Totality: 4m 02.2s

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.