Current Moon Phase

Waning Crescent
3% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Epsilon Eridanid Meteors Fall this Week

Epsilon Eridanid Meteors Fall this Week

With August’s celebrated Perseids meteor shower now behind us, sky watchers will have to wait until the Geminids shower in December for another really powerful display.

Fortunately for those who can’t get enough shooting stars, every month of the year features at least one shower. Not every meteor shower is created equal, though, and these light shows come in a wide range of intensities.

September features a handful of minor showers, including the Epsilon Eridanids, which peaks on the evening of the 12th. Though this is usually a low-intensity shower, it has been known to achieve rates of up to 40 meteors per hour.

This year is predicted to be a favorable year for the shower, and this week’s waning crescent Moon will leave the sky dark enough for viewing. The southern radiant, originating from the constellation Eridanus, will limit the meteors to the southeastern skies.

Astronomers believe this shower originates from debris left behind by Comet C/1854 L1 Klinkerfues, which was last observed in 1854.

1 comment

1 Ali { 09.19.12 at 11:15 am }

2 evenings ago, my husband witnessed a very low shooting star in the sky, he said he actually heard it whistle overhead….very strange indeed!

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.