Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
39% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Learn the Moon Phases

Learn the Moon Phases

Sure, everyone knows what a Full Moon is, but do you know what a Waxing Gibbous or a Waning Crescent are? Read this quick reference guide to become a Moon expert in no time!

New Moon: The Moon is not illuminated by direct sunlight.

Waxing Crescent: The visible Moon is partly, but less than one-half, illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing.

First Quarter: One-half of the Moon appears illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing.

Waxing Gibbous: The Moon is more than one-half, but not fully, illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing.

Full Moon: The visible Moon is fully illuminated by direct sunlight.

Waning Gibbous: The Moon is less than fully, but more than one-half, illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing.

Last Quarter: One-half of the Moon appears illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing.

Waning Crescent: The Moon is partly, but less than one-half, illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing.

2 comments

1 Greypoopon { 02.11.11 at 10:27 pm }

And for years, I thought Pluto was named after Micky’s dog. Now it’s just an orb of ice and dust.

2 Chloe { 02.09.11 at 5:19 pm }

Thats so cool how Pluto is a dwarf planet!

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.