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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Zodiac Zone: Meet Libra

Zodiac Zone: Meet Libra

Nearly everyone knows a little something about astrology — even if it’s only where to find the daily horoscope section in the local newspaper. Whether you truly believe the stars control your destiny, think it’s all bunk, or just like to have fun with it, the 12 signs of the zodiac are part of our cultural heritage. Over the next year, the Farmers’ Almanac will introduce you to the facts and mythology behind each constellation in the traditional Western zodiac. This month, Libra.

Libra is the seventh constellation of the zodiac. Its name is the Latin word meaning “measuring scales.”

The astrological symbol for Libra is ♎, and the constellation sits in the sky between Virgo to the west and Scorpius to the east. Other nearby constellations include Ophiuchus, Hydra, Lupus, and Centaurus.

Libra is a relatively faint constellation, containing no first magnitude stars. Some of the more prominent stars within its boundaries include Zubenelgenubi, Zubeneschamali, Zubenelakrab, and Brachium. By far, the most notable Libran star is Gliese 581, which has at least four planets, two of which are Earth-like planets within the star’s habitable zone.

In Greek mythology, Libra represents the scales held by Astraea, the goddess of justice (the constellation Virgo). It is the only sign in the zodiac that is an inanimate object, rather than an animal or person. To the Babylonians, Libra was known as “the claws of the scorpion” and considered part of the neighboring constellation, Scorpius.

Astrologically, the Sun resides in the house of Libra from September 23 to October 23 each year. People born during this period have Libra as their Sun sign. Proponents of astrological determinism believe that people born under the same Sun sign share certain character traits. Libra people are most often described as fair-minded, idealistic, easygoing, charming, compassionate, diplomatic, intelligent, and sensitive.

3 comments

1 Jason Elibox { 03.24.11 at 12:31 pm }

Really love reading about Astrology I would like to see more details about these Zodiac signs. Enjoy reading your Zodiac atticles mrs watson keep up ur good work, it helps mi find mi true inner self.

2 Matt Davis { 10.20.10 at 7:26 pm }

I have learned that the kabala regards astrological signs as metaphors for the 12 tribes of Abraham. They believe that in a past life we may have had a different sign
that would define what it is that we need for adnacing our karma (spiritual enlightenment) They are involved in the Moon phases or 29 day cycles which they believe is more accurate than the sun sign western astrology. Have I got this right? I am a novice.
It is intersting to note however that the Federal Reserve Bank, (private bank) has a astology wheel enblazoned on the ceiling of their main office. I have been told they use the charts for making policy and executing important decisions that affect all of us. I’d like to know why the 13th of the month was used extensively by Bill Clinton and others in exercising some of their not so nice policies.

3 Elizabeth Watson { 10.15.10 at 2:26 am }

I have enjoyed reading your articles. Please keep up the good work!
I am glad to see that someone is paying attention to astrological information.
Another attribute that you might wish to consider on behalf of those born with the Sun in Libra is that they seem to be extraordinarily blessed with balanced facial features. Such traits give those with their Sun Sign in Libra an edge up on the rest of us… as first perceptions are crucial. Just a thought. I would love to see you expand the astrological editorial within Farmers Almanac. — I would be happy to give you additional information if it would be helpful. In the meantime… Thanks!
Elizabeth Scott Watson
es_watson@yahoo.com

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