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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Celebrate July’s Independence Moon

Celebrate July’s Independence Moon

Voting to name July’s Full Moon has ended, and readers have overwhelmingly chosen the name “Full Independence Moon” for this month’s full Moon, which falls on Sunday, July 25, at 9:37 p.m.

The name “Full Independence Moon” was submitted by nine different people, the first of whom, and our winner, was Suzanne Curran of North Providence, R.I. Congratulations!

The traditional full Moon name for July is the The Full Buck Moon, because July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads. July’s Moon was also sometimes called the Full Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are most frequent during this time of year. Yet another name for this month’s Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

The idea behind the Farmers’ Almanac Name that Moon Contest was to come up with more up-to-date names for the full Moons, not as a replacement for the traditional names, but as modern alternatives that better reflect today’s activities and values. Independence Day, with its fireworks and festivities, is an old tradition, by most people’s reckoning, but new when compared to the traditional full Moon names, some of which date back to ancient times.

Be sure to visit our Name that Moon Contest page today to submit your suggestion for August’s full Moon name.

1 comment

1 fantasia { 09.10.10 at 9:07 am }

The stories and photos on this website are breathtaking. The photographer did a wonderful job!
I always wondered about the man in the moon, I was told one night by this man that the reason you see the man in the moon is because he was out at sea, his wife was unfaithful he left not to be seen again. He went to the moon and watches over her always. Sounds silly, but just another story!

Thank You

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.