Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
14% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Inside the 2014 Farmers’ Almanac

Looking for the Canadian Edition? Click here »

Long-range weather forecasts, best day guides, planting tips, recipes, sustainable living advice, healthy hints, natural remedies, astronomy, and a bit of humor is what you’ll find in the 2014 Farmers’ Almanac. The Farmers’ Almanac is your source for ideas on how to “grow your life.” It contains the right amount of useful advice mixed in with weather, wit and wisdom.

This year’s edition is also packed full of tips, trivia, teasers, and thought-provoking articles including . . .

  • Why we want you to pool, then pitch, the penny, (page 42)
  • Which national park is the hottest, snowiest, sandiest, most mountainous, and more, (page 67)
  • Why coffee and egg yolks aren’t as bad for you as you think, (page 54)
  • Why peanut butter, baking soda, and yogurt are good items to keep on hand, (pages 12 & 52)
  • Natural remedies for removing skunk smells, rashes, dry skin and more. (pages 50 and 51)
  • 10 Ways World War 1 changed America (page 8)
  • What frozen dead guys, a headless chicken, and wooly worms have in common, (page 190)
  • What type of hunting is outlawed in Kansas, (page 110)
  • What trees are fast growing and good replacements for those lost during wild weather events (page 170)
  • Why sunflowers aren’t just another pretty flower (page 188)
  • Recipes for homemade bread, meals you can make in a jar, and recipes and tips on how to make one meal turn into many . . . (pages 82, 84, 88)
  • Why this year’s Super Bowl should be nicknamed the “Storm Bowl,” (page 36)
  • Best days to fish, quit smoking, plant your garden, shop, look for a job, cut your hair and many more in 2014 . . .
  • And a chilling weather forecast you have to read!

It’s all in the 2014 Farmers’ Almanac!

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.